Historic Bridge Marketing Pages

One way in which historic bridges may be preserved is when a bridge slated for replacement is given to a new owner for relocation and restoration/rehabilitation. Similarly, abandoned bridges may be available for relocation and reuse. This is referred to a historic bridge marketing. Need a bridge for a bike path, nature trail, or golf course? Instead of spending money on a nondescript pre-fabricated truss bridge, consider instead reusing a historic bridge that will be a beautiful historic landmark, while also promoting the values of sustainability. Some states have made the bridges they are currently marketing available on a website. The links to those websites appear below.

Individually Listed Bridges

Texas: County Road (CR) 232 over San Marcos River

The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) is offering the historic bridge detailed below for adoption and reuse according to federal transportation and historic preservation laws. The bridge is located in Gonzales County, on County Road (CR) 232 crossing San Marcos River. Interested parties may request additional information, indicate an interest, or submit a reuse proposal by contacting:

Barbara Obelgoner, Environmental Specialist TxDOT Yoakum District
Mailing Address: 403 Huck Street
Yoakum, TX 77995-2804
Phone Number: (361) 293-4371
Email address: Barbara.Obelgoner@txdot.gov

Bridge Location
▪ County: Gonzales County
▪ Highway or Facility: CR 232
▪ Feature Crossed: San Marcos River
▪ GIS Locational Information https://arcg.is/0P5SDf0

Span 1 Information


▪ Bridge Owner Gonzales County
▪ Main-span Type: Pratt-through truss
▪ Main-span Length 98 feet
▪ Roadway Width 16 feet
▪ Year Built Between 1898 and 1907
▪ Builder E.P. Alsbury & Son (Houston, TX)

Span 2 Information


▪ Bridge Owner Gonzales County
▪ Main-span Type: Half-hip pony truss
▪ Main-span Length 59.5 feet
▪ Roadway Width 16 feet
▪ Year Built Unknown
▪ Builder Unknown

Span 3 Information


▪ Bridge Owner Gonzales County
▪ Main-span Type: Warren pony truss
▪ Main-span Length 76 feet
▪ Roadway Width 16 feet
▪ Year Built Unknown
▪ Builder Unknown

Historic Significance of the Bridge

In 2014, the Texas State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) determined all extant metal truss bridges in Texas historically significant under Criterion C at the local level as rare surviving examples of their type.

The CR 232 at San Marcos River Bridges consists of a pinned Pratt through truss, a pined Pratt half-hip pony truss, a riveted Warren pony truss and 5 non-contributing steel stringer approach spans. The through-truss was constructed in 1898 by E.P. Alsbury & Son (Houston, Texas) — agent for N.J. Steel and Iron Co. The half-hip was constructed in 1907. The construction date for the Warren pony truss is unknown, but might be circa 1920. Special features of the bridge include perforated county name in the portals on the Pratt through- truss, ornamentation over one portal, and decorative knee bracing. The bridge is significant as a rare surviving example of once-common types except for the half-hip which was a rare type. It is also significant for the use of three truss spans to cross the San Marcos River and for high artistic value in the decorative portal and knee bracing.

New York: Livingston Avenue Bridge over Hudson River, Albany and Rensselaer.
Available until July 13, 2022

Built 1901
Design: Main span: One 260 foot span: Rivet-connected through truss swing span with riveted connections. Also has fixed truss span and late girder approach spans.

PUBLIC NOTICE

New York State Department of Transportation

Removal of the Livingston Avenue Bridge over the Hudson River, Albany and Rensselaer, NY

Project Identification Number 1935.49

The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) proposes the removal of the Livingston Avenue Bridge (LAB), a historic Baltimore Truss rail bridge over the Hudson River.  The bridge is scheduled for removal in 2026.

The NYSDOT is actively seeking new ownership willing to responsibly adapt the LAB for reuse at a new location, dismantle for guaranteed future use at a new location, reuse salvaged components for educational or interpretive materials, or reuse salvaged components on a similar historic bridge in need of rehabilitation. If ownership of the bridge is transferred to another party for reuse, the transfer deed will include preservation covenants that require the new owner to move and maintain the bridge in accordance with the “Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings.”  The proposed reuse plan and specifications will be forwarded to the New York State Historic Preservation Office for review and consultation. If no party is found to take possession of the existing bridge, it will be removed.

Completed in 1901, the LAB is identified as individually eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. It consists of a 260-foot-long continuous truss swing span (spans 8-9) and four trusses (spans 5-7, 10) that span the navigable portion of the river, and four plate girder spans (spans 1-4) that connect the bridge from Albany County to Rensselaer County. The rail bridge has two sets of tracks. The piers are mortared-cut limestone with continuous timber piles. The swing span pivots 90 degrees clockwise to open the navigation channel on each side. The span is operated by electric motors from a control booth positioned in the raised center structure of the truss. Electricity is provided to the booth by wires suspended from steel frame towers at the ends of the adjacent fixed spans.

Inquiries may be submitted via email:

livingstonavebridge@dot.ny.gov

Subject: Bridge Reuse

or via Mail:

Livingston Avenue Bridge Project
New York State Department of Transportation
Office of Design
50 Wolf Road – POD-24
Albany, NY 12232

View Bridge On BridgeHunter.com

All correspondence should be received by July 13, 2022.


New York: Route 11 Bridge (BIN 4008540) over Oneida River, Hamlet of Brewerton Onondaga and Oswego Counties
Available until January 31, 2022

Built 1932
Design: Main span: One 207.7 foot main span: State standard plan, polygonal Warren through truss with riveted connections. Also has two riveted through plate girder approach spans. Total bridge length: 385 Feet
Length of largest span: 120 ft.

View Bridge on BridgeHunter.com

The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) is seeking parties interested in taking ownership of the “Route 11 Bridge”, a 3-span structure comprised of thru-girder approach spans and a truss main span that is currently located across the Oneida River in the Hamlet of Brewerton. The current owner, NYSDOT, in consultation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) determined the bridge is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP).

The Route 11 Bridge over the Oneida River (BIN 4008540) is a structurally deficient bridge (built in 1932) with advanced deterioration noted to critical components of the structure. This is a three-span bridge consisting of two thru-girder approach spans and a thru-truss main span with a total bridge length of approximately 385 feet. The bridge deck and high-density concrete overlay, performed in 1968 and 1986 respectively, have performed well and are still in generally serviceable condition, but have exceeded their intended design service lives. However, steel deterioration is a significant concern, specifically for that noted to the main span truss bottom chords. This affects the truss bottom chords, bottom chord panel point gusset plates, bottom lateral gusset plates, floor beam/truss connections, and fascia stringers. The bridge was closed temporarily in August 2014 to address a prompt interim action red flag for steel floor beam web losses. The spill-through abutments and wingwalls exhibit areas of serious concrete deterioration. The piers have needed past emergency repairs to the deteriorating tall columns. The bridge has received red and/or yellow structural flags almost every inspection since the 2007 biennial inspection.

Bridge removal cost is estimated at approximately $535,000. This estimated cost excludes the removal of the lead-based paint from the steel structure in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency’s requirements. In lieu of removing the lead-based paint a quid pro quo agreement to accept liability for the lead-based paint may be acceptable. The bridge foundations or piers would be removed separately by the new bridge contractor.

Interested parties are required to meet certain conditions, which include:

  • Provide a comprehensive written plan for the preservation and future use of the bridge, including any desired modifications, and the estimated cost of rehabilitation. It is preferred that the new owner be able to use the entire superstructure, or at least one superstructure span, of the truss bridge.
  • Maintain the structure and the features that give it historic significance according to prescribed standards.
  • Assume all future legal and financial responsibility for the structure, including “hold harmless” agreements to the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) and to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). Post a performance bond.
  • Provide proof of ability to assume the financial and administrative responsibilities of bridge ownership throughout its existence.

Agencies, jurisdictions, organizations or private owners interested in obtaining ownership of the bridge for aesthetic, historic, recreation or other uses should contact Erin Cole at (315) 428-4739 or email at Erin.Cole@dot.ny.gov. This contact must be received no later than close of business on Jan 31, 2021. Funding to assist with relocation or rehabilitation may be provided up to the estimated cost of bridge demolition. If an interested party secures its own federal funding, it is noted that any bridge preserved with federal funding shall thereafter not be eligible for any other highway funds pursuant to Public Law 100-17, Section 123(f) (Historic Bridges).

Texas: Riveted Warren Pony Truss:

Bridge Information

Owner:                                 RPC Oak, LLC
Type:                                     Warren (with verticals) pony truss bridge
Length:                                 Approximately 70 feet
Width:                                  Approximately 10 feet
Year Built:                            1920
Builder:                                Kansas City Bridge Company
Current Location:             3310 Oakwell Court, San Antonio, TX

Narrative Description

The Oakwell Farms Truss Bridge was constructed in 1920 by Kansas City Bridge Company under county engineer R.A. Nichols and state highway engineer Rollen J. Windrow.  The bridge was a result of the Federal-Aid Road Act in 1916.

The Kansas City Bridge Company was a prolific bridge builder building thousands of bridges across the United States until 1940.  Bridges with this specific design are being lost at an alarming rate due to road widening and increased standards for weight on bridges.

RECIPIENT SHALL ACQUIRE THE BRIDGE ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITH ALL FAULTS. ROSEWOOD PROPERTY COMPANY AND ITS AFFILIATES (COLLECTIVELY “RPC”) MAKE NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY (EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED) WITH RESPECT TO: (A) THE NATURE, QUALITY OR CONDITION OF THE BRIDGE; (B) THE SUITABILITY OF THE BRIDGE FOR ANY AND ALL ACTIVITIES AND USES WHICH RECIPIENT MAY CONDUCT; (C) THE COMPLIANCE OF OR BY THE BRIDGE WITH ANY LAWS; (D) THE HABITABILITY, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OF THE BRIDGE; (E) THE OPERATION OF THE BRIDGE; or (F) ANY OTHER MATTER WITH RESPECT TO THE BRIDGE.

Kay Adkins, Development Manager
2101 Cedar Springs Road, Suite 1600, Dallas, TX 75201
Direct: 214-849-9015
Cell: 214-632-9434
kadkins@rosewd.com

Bridge Marketing Websites By State

Note that states without an available link do not currently have a historic bridge marketing page. Please contact the DOT directly for inquiries on available bridges. A list of DOT websites is available here.

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan (Unofficial List of Potentially Available Abandoned Bridges)
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana – Information and Contacts Only
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee – Information and Contacts Only
Texas
          Denton County, Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Nationwide Listings of Unconfirmed But Potentially Available Bridges Only

United States Nationwide – Unconfirmed potentially available bridges on BridgeHunter.